Cherie Muleh Harris Geospatial  

Cherie Muleh

Cherie Muleh joined Exelis Visual Information Solutions (now Harris Geospatial Solutions) in 2003 and has worked as Manager of Technical Support Services, ENVI Product Manager, and Global Technical Solutions Engineer. Currently she is the Channel Manager for Australia, Latin America, and Southeast Asia, responsible for managing the business and relationships with Harris VIS partners.

Prior to joining Exelis VIS, Ms. Muleh worked as a research assistant for the University of Alaska Fairbanks Institute for Arctic Biology, studying the relationships between arctic biology and climate change, using remote sensing and GIS. She also was a member of the NASA Land Cover and Land Use Change program, studying vegetation migration on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska.

In the last few years, she has worked extensively with the Exelis VIS distributor network, helping them learn how to use, promote, and sell the ENVI family of products.

Ms. Muleh holds a Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Middlebury College and a Master’s degree in Biology from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. She currently lives in Colorado, U.S.A. with her husband.

27

Feb

2017

Using SAR Imagery for Road Maintenance

Author: Cherie Muleh

How do you go about trying to find whether a building has sunk enough to become unsafe and destabilized? That might not be as much as you think. Or what if you needed to know if there has been lateral movement of a railroad due to a landslide which could cause a car to derail? When we need to know precise, fine scale answers, we can turn to SAR data for this type of knowledge.

SAR data has the ability to detect millimeter or centimeter scale movements, so you can really understand complex infrastructure decisions. Check out this blogpost by Dipak Paudyal at Esri Australia to see an example of using SAR data to monitor road subsidence. The post is called “SAR imagery – the smart solution for road maintenance.” By using remote sensing to study these sorts of infrastructure projects, we can economically use data to look at our infrastructure on a regional level.  

Have you thought about using SAR data to help with your infrastructure needs?

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Categories: ENVI Blog | Imagery Speaks

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11

Oct

2016

Could satellites be the secret to detecting water leaks?

Author: Cherie Muleh

As a Channel Manager for Harris Geospatial, I look after our distributors in Australia, Latin America, and Southeast Asia. Distributors sell our products in their respective regions, handle support, training, and also uncover new uses for our products. Esri Australia's Principal Consultant Remote Sensing and Imagery, Dipak Paudyal, is driving new insights with data, and has started investigating a new way that satellites could help detect water leaks.

Water utility companies routinely face millions of dollars in lost revenue with wasted water and leaks in their pipeline infrastructure. In a recent blog, Dipak explores if there is a way for satellite data and location analytics to help preserve water loss and also enable utility companies to better identify cracks in their system. As Dipak notes, “…water utilities that are willing to think outside of the box and investigate new technologies such as SAR imagery will be guaranteed to stay ahead of the game.”

Analyzing all of this data requires the use of specialty tools like ENVI SARscape to help users transform raw SAR data into an easy-to-interpret images for further analysis. Check out Dipak's blog and let us know what do you think? Can we help the water industry better map their resources with this type of technology?

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22

Jan

2013

22 Minutes of Science and Music!

Author: Cherie Muleh

What a way to kick off the New Year!  I discovered this informative and eclectic podcast while perusing my science section on Flipboard.   This podcast, called “LandSat, the next generation”, includes many of the topics that EarthSky covers to ring in the year.  Here are a couple of the topics they cover in the podcast:

Did you know that the next generation of Landsat satellites will launch in February 2013 as part of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission?  Now that this excellent archive of data is free, we will be able to continue our studies of the Earth’s surface with this new imagery.

  landsat
Artist’s impression of a Landsat satellite. Image courtesy of NASA

They also discussed how Australia is experiencing record heat and fires across the continent. Temperatures across the country can be easily mapped to see regional changes year over year. The hot and dry heat is responsible for several fires and is also having an interesting side effect: the slowdown of gasoline sales. In some places (note dark red regions below), it has become too hot that you couldn’t even pump gas - when it is that hot, unleaded fuel can vaporize in the heat.

aus_map
Map courtesy of Australian Bureau of Meteorology

Listen to the podcast and let me know what you think! What projects will you be thinking of, knowing that you will be able to receive more Landsat data in the future?

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25

Oct

2012

Even More ENVI and ArcGIS Integration

Author: Cherie Muleh

Wow, what a great turn out last week ENVI and E3De – Learn the Latest!  webinar!  I am always happy to hear your questions, see how you’re using our software, and share our latest and greatest updates with you.   This week, I’ll explain how the latest version of ENVI integrates even more with Esri’s ArcMap, by supporting image services and mosaic datasets.

Now, all of the imagery data available through Esri image services and mosaic datasets can be used in ENVI.  You can search for additional data sets to conduct change detection analysis, include new information for building footprints and parcel information, add other modalities of data for data fusion analysis, and add city base maps to give your image analysis results greater contextual and situational awareness.

During the webinar, there were some questions about how to open image services in ENVI.  When you access a published Esri image service from ENVI, you do it by using the Open Remote Dataset dialog and you enter a URL, such as this one here for ArcGIS imagery online: http://imagery.arcgisonline.com/ArcGIS/rest/services, and then ENVI will connect to that image service.
ENVI ArcGIS Integration

With the tight integration between ENVI and ArcGIS, you can easily export results into ArcMap, create map packages, and create map products. ENVI uses the same print layout view as ArcMap, so all you need to do is apply an existing template file, or an .mxt or .mxd, and then you’ll be ready to print from ENVI as well. There are many ways that ENVI and ArcMap are integrated, and I’ve just touched on a couple of them here.
ENVI ArcGIS Integration

How do you take advantage of the ENVI and ArcMap integration? Do you plan to take advantage of the Esri image services access in ENVI?

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16

Aug

2012

Government Imagery Data, Free & Easy to Find!

Author: Cherie Muleh

Aerial photography and satellite images provide state and local government officials with a bird’s eye view of the geography, assets, and infrastructure of their communities.  These days, there are a lot of government imagery data formats that are freely available.  Knowing what they are, how to access them, and what sorts of image analysis you can do with the data is very important.

Let’s start with going over some commonly used freely available data sources.  I’ll start with ASTER imagery.

ASTER , (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) is a multispectral imaging instrument that launched in December 1999. ASTER data is used to create detailed maps of land surface temperature, reflectance, and it has two forward and backward looking bands of data, which can be used to generate digital elevation models, or DEMs. It also has a high spatial resolution, ranging from 15 -90 meters, so it can be used for a variety of image analysis applications, such as land cover analysis, vegetation mapping, change detection, and terrain analysis. You can access the imagery from the USGS GloVis Viewer, which is a quick and easy online search and order tool for selected satellite and aerial data.

Another type of data that you can access from the GloVIS site is MODIS data. MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer) has a spatial resolution that ranges from 250 m – 1000m, and MODIS views the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands.  These data products observe features of the land, oceans, and the atmosphere.  MODIS Level 1 and atmosphere products are available through the LAADS web, Land Products are available through the Land Processes DAAC website at the U. S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center, and Cryosphere data products (snow and sea ice cover) are available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado.

Some other types of data that you may come across include ALI and Hyperion. ALI (Advanced Land Imager) provides image data over ten spectral bands, with spatial resolutions ranging from 30 meters for the multispectral bands and 10 meters for the panchromatic band.  Hyperion collects 220 bands of data, with wavelengths ranging from 0.357 to 2.576 micrometers. It has a spatial resolution of 30 meters for all bands. Because it has this many bands, we refer to this type of data as hyperspectral data.  Hyperspectral imaging has wide ranging applications for material identification in mining, geology, forestry, agriculture, and environmental management. These data products are also available for search and download through Earth Explorer or GloVis.

Landsat is one of the most popular of the freely available data sets. LANDSAT-7 is from the most recent Landsat mission, and is currently operated as a primary satellite with a spatial resolution of 30 meters.  LANDSAT-5, from the previous Landsat mission, was equipped with a multispectral scanner (MSS) and thematic mapper (TM), which is a more advanced version of the observation equipment used in the MSS, and observes the Earth's surface in seven spectral bands that range from visible to thermal infrared regions. It has a spatial resolution of 30 meters, and all Landsat data is in now freely available in the USGS archive.

Another very popular freely available data type is NAIP data. The NAIP (National Agriculture Imagery Program) mission acquires multispectral aerial imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in the continental U.S.  NAIP imagery products are available for free download through the USDA Geospatial Data Gateway.

If you’re interested in learning more about freely available government data, register for our August 29th webinar, Using Free Government Data and Remote Sensing to Create a More Powerful GIS! What types of analyses are you doing with your data? Are there other types of data you’d like to see highlighted in the web seminar?

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